AI performed ‘huge function’ in approach to pandemic, says UAE synthetic intelligence minister

AI results in ‘great return on investment’ in coping with pandemic

The UAE approached the COVID-19 pandemic “as a scientist,” mentioned Omar Al Olama, the UAE’s Minister of Artificial Intelligence, Digital Economy and Remote Work Applications.

Al Olama was appointed by the UAE as the primary synthetic intelligence (AI) minister on the planet in 2017, when he was simply 27 years outdated. That 12 months, his ministry launched a technique “to become one of the world leaders in AI by 2031.”

The COVID-19 pandemic, it seems, could have accelerated the UAE’s functions of AI to governance and public well being, and to establishing the Emirates as a world chief in AI, as Al Olama, now 31, defined in an unique Zoom interview with Al-Monitor on Nov. 18.

Al Olama describes a coverage response to the pandemic by the UAE that has been data- and analytics-driven and characterised by openness to totally different concepts, nimbleness in response to altering occasions, and willingness to simply accept calculated dangers. 

“We actually were very open to many different solutions, and many different theories out there,” he mentioned. “And we labored with everybody, from the East and the West, to attempt to discover the correct options that may be deployed within the UAE to make us return to living a comparatively regular life. Not the traditional life that we’re used to. People nonetheless must put on masks. There’s nonetheless a whole lot of concentrate on the overall group’s security, however AI performed a giant function in getting us thus far.”

The adaptation of AI was central to the UAE’s response to the pandemic, including in the development of the Alhosn public health application, which has allowed rapid innovation in testing and tracking for COVID. Based upon AI simulations, the government was also able to anticipate what would be needed at various stages of the pandemic — such as numbers of ventilators and vaccines required. 

The process “produced a great return on investment for the UAE, because we were quickly able to become one of the leading countries in the world in terms of vaccination rates,” said Al Olama. “The reason why it was a calculated risk and the outcomes were very positive is because we leveraged every technology and human ingenuity with it to plan forward for this COVID-19 pandemic, while also deliberating continuously to understand if there are any changes that might affect these plans. So when a new variant came out, we actually had to go back, reassess the situation, understand what it means for our plans, and if there wasn’t a big risk on it at the time, we would continue and make a few tweaks. If there was a big risk, then the plans would change.”

“And today everyone considers the UAE model one of the best models out there for dealing with the pandemic, and for going back to a life that is very close to the normal life we’re used to,” he said.

Investing in digital roads

Asked about the continued growth in AI investments worldwide, Al Olama responded that the numbers could and should probably be higher, as AI is now a “foundational” technology for innovation and development in the public and private sectors.   

“AI has become such an important factor of developing solutions for the future, and such an important technology, that today, it represents a foundational layer of all businesses that are going to start up, whether it’s a hardware business or a software business,” or even a restaurant, he said.

“The new roads that we need to be building right now are roads in the digital realm. High-performance computing, for example, is exceptionally important. We actually invested in a high-performance computer in the UAE government that is open for free for startups and academia to use to train their AI algorithms, to use as well to run simulations; because we believe that not everyone will be able invest in this infrastructure, but we provide as a government; we make it a lot easier for them to start up and experiment and actually develop their solutions on their companies.”

Attracting and developing talent

The UAE is pursuing a two-track strategy to develop a world class workforce proficient in AI and related technologies. 

The first track involves educating Emiratis in the uses and applications of AI.

“Our motto for using and deploying AI is condensed or summarized into the acronym BRAIN [Build a Responsible Artificial Intelligence Nation],” said Al Olama, “because a responsible deployment, a responsible development, a responsible use of AI is the only way that we can develop this technology in a way that is not going to make us regret it in the years to come.

“In thinking about responsible use and deployment and development of AI, we need to understand that the people that are going to be working with this technology are people that need to be educated and trained about AI and are people that need to not fear it, but try to at least understand a certain aspect of it to take the right decisions that will help them achieve better results.”

The UAE has expanded its AI camps and National Program for Coders for students of all ages. And the Mohammad bin Zayed University for Artificial Intelligence this month launched its first executive education program.

The university “is a forward-looking investment that is His Highness Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan and the leadership of the UAE put to ensure that we don’t just try to leverage on global expertise, but actually contribute to global knowledge creation when it comes to artificial intelligence,” said Al Olama.

Another track is attracting global talent, where the UAE has an advantage as a major international hub for trade, travel and business.

“There’s a lot of talent here that’s hungry for the ability to grow and that maybe want to migrate to a different market, but because of the pandemic situation, because of different variables, they’re not able to migrate to the US or Canada or Europe. That opens up an opportunity for the UAE to be a stepping stone for them, where they can actually come, realize their dreams, create a startup,” says Al Olama.

UAE ‘very serious’ about autonomous vehicles

Al Olama describes the UAE’s adoption of autonomous vehicles as “very serious,” working with some of the leading global transportation and technology firms.

And as with the pandemic, science, testing and safety guide the UAE approach.

“There were so many challenges that came up after testing the technology,” Al Olama said. “And we said that the only way we can actually work with these companies is to raise these challenges and try to find solutions, and to deploy them slowly but maturely across the country, and tested effectively in the UAE. Safety and security of people on the roads is paramount, but we’re also testing systems like autonomous buses that take people across tourist destinations and tourist areas.”

“And this isn’t happening [just] in Dubai and Abu Dhabi. It’s not happening just in the capital and, for example, the business hub of the UAE,” he adds. “It’s happening across the country. So, a great example is there’s an autonomous bus service that takes people across the area of Ajman, which I inspected with his Highness Sheikh Rashid bin Humaid Al Muaimi a few days back.”

The US, China, and the need for ‘constant dialogue’ on AI

When we last spoke with Al Olama in 2019, he said he did not agree that the US-China rivalry will define the global AI competition. He stands by that assessment, adding that the rivalry also can’t define the UAE’s approach to its AI strategy and international partnerships, as the Emirates is a technology importer. And the US and China would be well served, he believes, by dialogue on AI.

“With regards to working with the US and working with China, the US is historically the UAE’s go-to partner,” says Al Olama. “We don’t forget the very deep-rooted relationships between the leadership and the people of the UAE and the United States. But there’s another thing that we also need to understand, which is today we are a technology importer. When it comes to technology, if we need to procure it and we need to work with partners on it, we will always favor our partners, but we also favor everyone else that has the technology. So we don’t want to be biased against a country, and we want to work with everyone on this. We also believe that there is a definite advantage of engagement between the US and China on the development of AI, or at least on understanding what’s happening on the AI front in both countries.”

“There needs to be a constant dialogue, and this is something that the UAE calls for continuously,” said Al Olama. “We are trying to ensure that AI becomes a tool that is used for good by all countries, and we want to make sure that our long-lasting partners, and the favored partner of UAE, which is the US, are also championing this motto.”

The full interview, lightly edited for publication, was conducted by Andrew Parasiliti.

Al-Monitor:  Mr. Minister, since we last met, the world has struggled with the COVID-19 pandemic, which it seems has been a catalyst for AI applications with regard to public health and governments in the UAE. Would you say the pandemic indeed been a catalyst, or accelerator, or a disruptor for your overall AI strategy?

Al Olama:  So thank you very much, Andrew, for having me. It’s an absolute pleasure talking to you once again.

The pandemic, I think, was a pandemic with many different phases.

The beginning of the pandemic was probably a disrupter, not just for the UAE, but for the whole world. Because we suddenly had to take decisions on everything:  Whether we were going to go to work tomorrow, and from a government perspective, whether schools are going to be running or not.

And even when it comes to deploying technology, there were a lot of questions asked. Was the technology ready? Are we able to actually use it effectively?

Now for the UAE, there were lots of investments that were being put for many years in advance, that were going to be deployed at one point of time.

So if we look at the infrastructure, the connectivity in the UAE, the number of connected devices and the investments, for example, these devices in education as one example, right? All of these investments were for a day that will come, that we’re going to go into virtual education.

Most experts at some point of time said that virtual education, or remote education, is going to be mainstream probably by 2024, and some estimated by 2026. Now, that turned out to be something that was accelerated during COVID.

So we actually overnight went from conventional education in the classroom to remote education. Everyone was able to just work and study from home. The same is true as well for working from home. And the same was also true for remote healthcare and telemedicine.

In that perspective, COVID was a great accelerator. In other fields, we actually had to try to create solutions, as we go along, to ensure that we’re able to deal with the pandemic, where every single interaction between people increased the risk of exposure and also increased the risk of spread.

So for example, track-and-trace programs were deployed across the world, in many different countries like Singapore and the UK and others. Our track-and-trace program also uses artificial intelligence to try to understand where are the pockets of spread, and where have people been, to know exactly how we should effectively try to deal with the COVID-19 outbreak and the pandemic itself.

There was a lot also being done to try to speed the result-gathering process, or the results process, when it comes to testing. Because in the beginning, if you remember, results used to come out in 24 hours, sometimes take 48 hours. And that doesn’t make sense if you want people to actually go back to living a normal life.

So, there was a lot of R and D, and a lot of expenditure, being actually invested into trying to understand how we can test more effectively, and how can we actually understand if people have COVID or if they haven’t.

And the UAE has been approaching this as a scientist. We actually were very open to many different solutions, and many different theories out there. And we worked with everyone, from the East and the West, to try to find the right solutions that can be deployed in the UAE to make us go back to living a relatively normal life. Not the normal life that we’re used to. People still need to wear masks. There’s still a lot of focus on the general community’s safety, but AI played a big role in getting us to this point. And today everyone considers the UAE model one of the best models out there for dealing with the pandemic, and for going back to a life that is very close to the normal life we’re used to.

Al-Monitor: With regard to AI and dealing with the pandemic, tell us more about the Alhosn application for medicine and public health, because that’s been a big part of your adaptation, and of the success you’ve had in testing and tracking. And what do you see as the next steps, in terms of AI and public health, given what you’ve learned from the experience of the pandemic?

Al Olama: Thank you very much for that great question. Now, if we look at the Alhosn app, and the approach that the UAE took with using this app, the first thing we needed to have is a real-time verification mechanism, or metric, to understand if someone really did get tested, and if they have or don’t have COVID, as well, who they interacted with, where they have been.

In the beginning, when people used to go and get tested for COVID, they would get a printout, paper. And soon enough, there were people who, because they were good in Photoshop or whatever, were able to photoshop the certificates and give themselves whatever result, not even going to go get tested. Now, to overcome that, and this is a global issue that most countries have to look at, because people even tried to, in many different geographies, counterfeit their vaccination certificates as well, to say that they’re vaccinated while they weren’t.

So, the app was developed. First using blockchain technology, as one of the main core elements of the app, and also using artificial intelligence for track and trace, for analytics on spread, on the different trends when it comes to the virus. How are people reacting to it? What is happening?

And also, once people actually got COVID and they needed to be isolated at home, the Alhosn app prompts you to give location data. And that’s something that was mandatory for those who were isolating. And the government itself wanted to ensure that people were abiding by the rules. And if they needed to go out, there was a way for us to provide safe means of travel, or at least provide the services that they required from home.

So, what the app would do if you were going to leave home, or if you actually needed to speak to someone, you would get a phone call from the health department asking you how you are doing, from a mental health perspective, or if you’re feeling depressed or sad. Giving you some reassurance that everything is fine. You know, this is just a phase that needs to be overcome, of you being isolated away from people, just to ensure that this does not spread. And also asking you if, for example, we need certain services to be delivered, and the government would do it.

The other thing where most people actually do not see AI being used, but AI was really something that we focused on in the UAE, was proper planning for the phase after the initial phase of the COVID-19 pandemic. So, how do you plan on how many vaccines you need to order, on how we order the PPE equipment, or ventilators, or whatever else we need. So, there is a lot of simulations being done, and run, and also tested, and they are the core proponent of this. Where we try to, effectively, invest for the future. Invest, to ensure that we are able to give people enough safety for them to live a normal life, to a certain degree, while at the same time not running into a roadblock of saying we should have ordered more vaccines, or we should have ordered more ventilators, or we should have done something differently.

That itself had had a great return on investment for the UAE, because we were quickly able to become one of the leading countries in the world in terms of vaccination rates. We were quickly able to reopen the economy, with keeping in mind that the UAE actually remained open for most of the year in 2020. So we did close down from March to April for around six weeks, but then we opened up for the rest of the year, which was a risk that most people actually thought would backfire. The reason why it was a calculated risk and the outcomes were very positive is because we leveraged every technology and human ingenuity with it to plan forward for this COVID-19 pandemic, while also deliberating continuously to understand if there are any changes that might affect these plans. So when a new variant came out, we actually had to go back, reassess the situation, understand what it means for our plans, and if there wasn’t a big risk on it at the time, we would continue and make a few tweaks. If there was a big risk, then the plans would change.

Al-Monitor: Minister, according to CB Insights, AI startups raised a record $17.9 billion in funding across 841 deals globally in the third quarter of this year. Now, AI adoption via technology funding is expected to contribute up to 14% to your country’s gross domestic product, equivalent to $97.9 billion by 2030. That’s according to a report by PricewaterhouseCoopers. Where do you see these investments going, and how do they impact your planning for AI for the UAE? What are the priorities and how is the investment flow influencing and impacting your priorities?

Al Olama: Andrew, hearing you say this does not surprise me at all. It’s like me telling you, if we flip around the question session, and I was actually asking you the question, and I was telling you that probably a thousand companies that actually use something related to electricity were able to raise $500 billion over the last year.

AI has become such an important factor of developing solutions for the future, and such an important technology, that today, it represents a foundational layer of all businesses that are going to start up, whether it’s a hardware business or a software business. Even if you’re going to open up a restaurant, there has to be a component of AI for you to be able to serve your customers better and grow. It doesn’t matter what sector you’re in. It doesn’t matter what your unique selling point is. AI has to be there.

So I’m actually surprised that the number isn’t bigger. I think as more and more people become more proficient in trying to understand and work with this technology, as more and more people start to actually try to experiment with it, we’re going to see incredible results moving forward. But I actually think that this is going to become the status quo.

In the UAE, we actually believe this strongly. So we wanted to first ensure that we’re able to catapult and accelerate AI companies in the UAE and actually make them global companies, rather than just local companies. We asked ourselves the first question, which is, what should we provide as a government to allow us to become that country that’s able to export these solutions? And the first thing that came to mind was, thinking about the conventional role of government, when governments built roads, the point of those roads were, yes, it was a big infrastructure spending at the time, but those roads actually changed the paradigm when it comes to economic activity, quality of life, et cetera, because people were able to use those roads for their cars to go longer distances, working better jobs, actually deliver certain goods and services to other areas. So net-net, everyone benefits and it was great.

The new roads that we need to be building right now are roads in the digital realm. High-performance computing, for example, is exceptionally important. We actually invested in a high-performance computer in the UAE government that is open for free for startups and academia to use to train their AI algorithms, to use as well to run simulations; because we believe that not everyone will be able invest in this infrastructure, but we provide as a government; we make it a lot easier for them to start up and experiment and actually develop their solutions on their companies.

Another core component is talent. We have been blessed with having 200 nationalities [living and working in the UAE]. We’ve been blessed with being a country that has great quality of life and great mobility as well. So people from around the world are flocking to the UAE. But how can we, first, rescale or upscale people in a digital field, and how can we attract the best people from around the world to come to the UAE?

On upscaling and rescaling, we’ve launched many programs. We’ve launched a program,  the AI camp, which moved fully digital this year, and trained  tens of thousands of people to a certain level of proficiency. Depending on the age group, depending on the actual class that they attended, they were able to get different skillsets, whether it’s how do we develop Apple app store apps, or how can you, for example, develop a full-stack software solution using a specific coding language, and so on, so forth.

We did a lot of programs on that front, but we also wanted to create a community. So we launched a program called the National Program for Coders, which had over 50 different partners and over 50 initiatives under it, that really focused on trying to bring people together that are like-minded; trying to attract the best people from around the region to the UAE.

Now, we see that the global talent market, when it comes to software, is actually, to some degree, very close to the UAE. Whether it’s Eastern European talent today that are up and coming in many fields, and are considered among the best in the world, or Indian talent, or let’s say talent from the subcontinent, or talent from China or Africa or the Middle East.

There’s a lot of talent here that’s hungry for the ability to grow, and that maybe want to migrate to a different market, but because of the pandemic situation, because of different variables, they’re not able to migrate to the US, Canada or Europe. That opens up an opportunity for the UAE to be a stepping stone for them, where they can actually come, realize their dreams, create a startup. … Maybe, you know, less than the NASDAQ or to expand to the US or Canada, which is perfectly good for us because we believe that the economic activity, the amount of foreign direct investment that’s going to come to the UAE, is going to be very positive.

Al-Monitor:  This year Dubai adopted AI-based driver evaluations. Last time we talked, we talked about your planning for autonomous vehicles. Can you provide us an update on how autonomous vehicles are being incorporated into your planning, and how imminent is the reality of autonomous vehicles in the UAE?

Al Olama: We are very serious about autonomous vehicles in the UAE. We’re also very serious about being a country where people can test the technology and being a country where we become one of the first deployers of this technology.

A few weeks earlier, so right at the beginning of this month, we raised a request with the Ministry of Interior, to the cabinet, to push for authorization to allow for self-driving cars to operate on the roads of the UAE.

We have been testing self-driving cars from the top developers of autonomous transports from around the world, in closed environments, where there is an infrastructure of roads of traffic lights, etc., and there were thousands of hours of testing being done, but because it’s a controlled environment, you actually cannot know if this is ready to be deployed on the streets.

But we were able to get an authorization from the cabinet of the UAE to deploy self driving car technologies — working with all of these companies, top companies in the world — on the streets of the UAE, but in ways where we can actually try to also guarantee the safety and security of people by  testing them on a staggered basis, where first we go to areas that don’t have a lot of foot traffic, that don’t have a lot of cars on the streets, that have more mature roads and more mature signages, etc.

What we understand today is depending on the technology that you use to run your vehicle, there are different challenges. If using a computer vision based system, there might be some issues with humidity, for example, fogging up the glass of the camera or the glass of the windshield. That will affect the visibility of the car. And in that specific example, there are many solutions to test that. Whether it’s using windshield wipers or using other technologies to try to offset the challenge of humidity.

When it comes to, for example, Lidar technologies, there are certain challenges with regards to camera flashes or radar flashes blinding the Lidar.

So, there were so many challenges that came up after testing the technology. And we said that the only way we can actually work with these companies is to raise these challenges and try to find solutions, and to deploy them slowly but maturely across the country, and [that they are] tested effectively in the UAE. Safety and security of people on the roads is paramount, but we’re also testing systems like autonomous buses that take people across tourist destinations and tourist areas.

And this isn’t happening in Dubai and Abu Dhabi. It’s not happening just in the capital and, for example, the business hub of the UAE. It’s happening across the country. So, a great example is there’s a autonomous bus service that takes people across the area of Ajman, which I inspected with his Highness Sheikh Rashid bin Humaid Al Muaimi a few days back.

The point here is there’s two things. There’s the regulation;  we are very aggressively trying to change the conventional traditional regulations to meet with the demand of the providers of these technologies and the technology itself.

But then there’s also the technology, as we deploy this technology in different areas. So if we move it from, for example, areas like California or Shanghai or wherever it’s being tested, into an environment, that’s out where there’s a lot more heat, there’s a lot more humidity, the weather changes quite drastically from winter to summer, and we see how it affects these vehicles, we will be able to push the technology forward. And this is what matters in our perspective.

Al-Monitor: The Environment Agency – Abu Dhabi (EAD) has developed a good administration approach to groundwater storage, utilizing AI programs and machine line language to manage and function wells, decide portions of pumped water, and management water high quality. Tell us about this challenge. This is a crucial one for not simply the UAE, however for the area, I’d assume.

Al Olama: For this challenge particularly, I believe in case you converse to the staff that is engaged on it, they’d provide you with much more. But let me clarify to you why this challenge was executed successfully within the UAE and why this is only one of many examples the place the UAE is attempting to ship superior applied sciences, not only for industrial achieve, however really for long run, extra sustainable living, long run wellbeing of people and other people.

When we take into consideration the problem that we’re going through, the problem of local weather change, the problem of desertification, the problem of sure sources being depleted and water is on the high of that record, we have to perceive that this can be a problem with many transferring components: transferring components of the temperature, transferring components of human exercise when it comes to constructing buildings and digging underground, and even for instance, extracting water from underground reservoirs, and so on.

Once we do all of these items, we have an effect on the pure sources, we have an effect on the setting in methods that aren’t linear.

So, every [effect varies], if we will take a look at it in share phrases, perhaps it will likely be a 10 % impact; others will likely be a 5 % impact; others will likely be 50 % impact. The solely solution to we are able to successfully deal and handle with these altering paradigms whereas additionally making certain that no matter we do is being executed with the long run in our thoughts and with duty … is to know how issues are altering as they’re altering. And that step goes it to be essential for us to fight, for instance, the problem of meals safety or power safety or water safety, whereas additionally taking a look at deploying these applied sciences for issues like saving wildlife and making certain that sure species do not go extinct, or combating local weather change. Because all of those challenges are challenges that aren’t very static, they’re transferring targets that we have to take a look at continually.

Al-Monitor: Let’s speak a bit of extra about expertise, which you mentioned up earlier. Mohamed bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence inaugurated its first government training program this month. Tell us in regards to the progress of constructing human capital, and the function of the college.

Al-Olama: The Mohamed bin Zayed University of Artificial Intelligence is a forward-looking funding that’s his Highness Mohamed bin Zayed Al Nahyan and the management of the UAE put to make sure that we do not simply attempt to leverage on world experience, however really contribute to world information creation in the case of synthetic intelligence.

The first approach you are able to do it’s by really eradicating to a sure diploma the extent of ignorance that you’ve inside the authorities and inside the personal sector to truly be capable of use and deploy AI successfully whereas pondering of it responsibly. Our motto for utilizing and deploying AI is condensed or summarized into the acronym BRAIN. We need to Build a Responsible Artificial Intelligence Nation as a result of a accountable deployment, a accountable growth, a accountable use of AI is the one approach that we are able to develop this know-how in a approach that’s not going to make us remorse it within the years to return.

In enthusiastic about accountable use and deployment and growth of AI, we have to perceive that the folks which can be going to be working with this know-how are those that must be educated and skilled about AI and are those that must not fear it, however attempt to not less than perceive a sure facet of it to take the correct choices that can assist them obtain higher outcomes.

If you’re blinded by AI, you’ll take choices that make a whole lot of sense at present, however 4, 5 or ten years down the road will have an effect on future generations or will hurt society.

If you’re frightened of it, you’ll take choices which can be based mostly on fear, and that can make you lose out on alternatives, and also will make you change into irrelevant in a world the place everyone seems to be attempting to make sense of the know-how and deploy it in the best method.

So Mohammed bin Zayed University for Artificial Intelligence is a world establishment when it comes to the caliber of individuals working in it and when it comes to the outputs which can be going to return out of this college, located within the UAE, that firstly is getting used to eradicate a whole lot of the ignorance that exists throughout the personal sector and the general public sector in the case of synthetic intelligence and helps them to, in a significant approach, form the way forward for AI within the UAE.

Al-Monitor: Mr. Minister, after we spoke two years in the past, you mentioned you did not see the US-China competitors for AI as a two-horse race. Do you continue to agree? As you look to partnerships and alternatives for the event of AI, what do you see as the advantages and benefits from coping with the US, and the advantages and benefits of coping with China? I assume your technique consists of partaking each.

Al Olama: I nonetheless keep on with my assertion, and I believe that it relies upon as effectively on what are we saying, or what do you imply whenever you say two-horse race? If we’re speaking in regards to the variety of corporations and the variety of options which can be going to return out, then it most likely is a two-horse race when it comes to the dimensions of the horses, and doubtless the opposite horses are ponies subsequent to them. So they’re fairly small. Because the US and China are at all times going to graduate much more options.

In phrases of high quality of options, that is the place the dialog adjustments, as a result of I do imagine that even smaller international locations can contribute to creating options as regards to synthetic intelligence software program that may be globally famend, that can have unbelievable impression or monumental impression on their fields, and the US and China can each profit from.

We see that from examples like, for instance, Israel the place some synthetic intelligence options which can be developed in Israel are adopted within the UAE and embraced by the US, and likewise being utilized in international locations even like China. It’s not simply Israel, it is Singapore as effectively. It’s the UK as effectively. It’s the UAE. It’s totally different international locations around the globe that may contribute from a high quality perspective.

Quantity is a distinct recreation as a result of that will depend on variety of engineers that you’ve, variety of startups that you’ve, inhabitants measurement. So usually, you’d see, and it is fairly regular for this to occur, international locations with an even bigger inhabitants will be capable of graduate much more choices out out there.

With regards to working with the US and dealing with China, the US is traditionally the UAE’s go-to associate. We remember the very deep-rooted relationships between the management and the folks of the UAE and the United States. But there’s one other factor that we additionally want to know, which is at present we’re a know-how importer. When it involves know-how, if we have to procure it and we have to work with companions on it, we are going to at all times favor our companions, however we additionally favor everybody else that has the know-how. So we do not need to be biased towards a rustic, and we need to work with everybody on this. We additionally imagine that there’s a particular benefit of engagement between the US and China on the event of AI, or not less than on understanding what’s taking place on the AI entrance in each international locations.

Why I say that is, if each international locations aren’t having dialog, and if the world turns into a world that’s polarized the place each international locations are creating on their very own with their allies, with none crosscutting conversations between different allies as effectively or between an ally of 1 nation with the opposite, what’s going to occur is there is perhaps an AI use case that could be very dangerous, the equal of a nuclear bomb or the equal of one thing that can have a huge impact on the digital footprint of the world or the world at massive that can hurt us and we won’t be able to foresee it and we won’t be able to take the correct choices to cease it.

There must be a relentless dialogue, and that is one thing that the UAE requires repeatedly. We try to make sure that AI turns into a device that’s used for good by all international locations, and we need to guarantee that our long-lasting companions, and the favored associate of UAE, which is the US, are additionally championing this motto.

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