Covid-safe masks for ENT procedures supplied to NHS without spending a dime

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SNAP device in use in a clinic Image copyright endoscope-i Ltd
Image caption The system means sufferers don’t have to take away their face coverings for procedures

A protecting system towards coronavirus for at-risk docs is to be offered free to the NHS.

The SNAP system for ear, nostril and throat surgeons was created after Burton-upon-Trent advisor Amged El-Hawrani died with Covid-19 in March.

He was one of many UK’s first senior medics to die with the virus, his demise exhibiting that they had been at critical danger.

The system clips over sufferers’ masks to stop the virus spreading via coughs and sneezes.

Image copyright endoscope-i LTD
Image caption Chris Coulson was one of many surgeons who developed the system to guard medics

It was developed by surgeons Ajith George and Chris Coulson, who mentioned nasendoscopy procedures – the place a small versatile tube fitted with a digital camera is inserted into the nostril – usually made sufferers cough, splutter and sneeze.

It works by clipping on to both facet of a traditional surgical face masks, making a gap for an endoscope to be inserted whereas maintaining the affected person’s nostril and mouth fully coated.

When it’s eliminated, a one-way valve closes the opening so no virus can escape.

Image copyright endoscope-i Ltd
Image caption Four thousand of the units will probably be offered to all NHS hospitals with an ear, nostril and throat division without spending a dime

Usually half one million nasendoscopies are carried out by the NHS every year.

But as a result of dangers, surgeons are at the moment solely doing 10% of their regular work.

“We were concerned about the safety of doctors but also about the risk of missed diagnoses and opportunities for treatment of patients,” Mr Coulson, an ENT surgeon working on the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, mentioned.

“Our aim has been to produce an easy-to-use, cheap device that would allow clinicians to return to routine practice.”

Four thousand of the units will probably be offered to all NHS hospitals with an ear, nostril and throat division without spending a dime.

An extra 26,000 have been manufactured on the market world wide.

“Covid-19 has led to heightened awareness about the spread of disease in clinical environments,” Mr George, based mostly on the Royal Stoke University Hospital, mentioned.

“We see the SNAP device having practical applications during the pandemic and beyond.”

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